Schedule

This is the first place to find out what we’re doing in class each day and what is due. Consult it before every class.

I update this page weekly, with the details of the following week’s assignments appearing on Wednesday or Thursday for the following week. You can scroll down to the tentative schedule to get a sense for how things may go, but anything in gray is subject to change.

Jump to:

Week 1

W, 8/21

In class

What’s due

  • Nothing!

F, 8/23

In class

  • Discussion: What is rhetoric?

What’s due

  • Create a disposable Twitter account if you don’t have one, or if you don’t want to use your normal one for class. See my blog post “Technology Requirements for Early Assignments” for details on this and upcoming technology requirements.
  • Before class begins, on Twitter, tweet a question or comment about the syllabus that includes the hashtag #rhet351.

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Week 2

M, 8/26 (Meet in Starr 108C, the computer lab)

In class

  • Survey
  • Customizing our online identities
  • Finding interesting stuff on Twitter
  • Introduce Rhetorical Analysis 1

What’s due

W, 8/28

In class

  • Discuss Herrick and Bitzer

What’s due

  • Read and annotate:
    • James A. Herrick, “An Overview of Rhetoric” (in the Readings folder in Moodle) (You only have to read the main part of the chapter, not the questions at the end.)
    • Sections I. and IV. of Lloyd F. Bitzer, “The Rhetorical Situation” (in the Readings folder in Moodle)
  • Bring your annotated copies of Herrick and Bitzer to class, printed out on paper (this time)

F, 8/30

Last day of add/drop

In class

  • Discuss Shirky

What’s due

  • NEW: Bring a print-out of the article you want to analyze for Rhetorical Analysis 1.
  • Read and annotate: Clay Shirky, Cognitive Surplus chapter 1
  • Blog post: Before class begins, write a new post on your blog with three questions directed to Shirky, followed by the answers you think he would give to your questions, written in his voice.
    • Example: you’ll write a question like this: “Why do you use the complicated phrase cognitive surplus when you could just say free time instead?” Then you’ll actually pretend to be Shirky and write a response as if you were him, something like this: “Well, I thought about that. But I like my phrase for a few reasons: first . . .” (except you’ll actually finish the answer).

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Week 3

M, 9/2

Labor Day: no class

W, 9/4

In class:

What’s due:

  • Complete draft of RA1, brought as a printed copy for peer review
  • Though we won’t discuss Shirky in class, we’ll spend the entire class on Friday discussing chapters 1 through 3 and 2. So if you have time, it’s a good idea to get started on Shirky 2 and 3 as well.

F, 9/6

In class:

  • Discuss Shirky chapter 2 and 3

What’s due:

  • Rhetorical Analysis 1 (of a text found on Twitter), submitted as a post on your blog
  • Read Shirky chapter 2 and 3 by this day.

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Week 4

M, 9/9

In class

What’s due

  • Nothing, but you have a lot of reading and blog post due on Wednesday, so I’d prepare for that.

W, 9/11

In class

  • Discussion of your blog posts, Gee, and Shirky

What’s due

  • Read:
    • Shirky, chapter 3
    • James Paul Gee, “Semiotic Domains” (in the Readings folder in Moodle)
  • Write a new post in your blog that explains at least one connection you see between the Gee and Shirky readings for today. While this post can be very informal (even funny, if you want!), be sure that your post demonstrates that you’re taking the assignment seriously and putting serious thought into it. You’ll send that message if you write more than just a couple sentences, prove your points with references to the texts (including page numbers), and explain connections that might not be immediately obvious to others in the class.

F, 9/13

In class

  • Listen to a few audio versions of RA1.
  • Brainstorming: what other texts could you use for a rhetorical analysis?
  • Looking ahead conversation

What’s due

————————————

Week 5

M, 9/16

In class

  • Introduce Rhetorical Analysis 2: analysis of a videogame
  • Play a game with a partner, looking for the game designers’ rhetorical strategies
  • How to take a screenshot

What’s due

  • Visit http://www.gamesforchange.org/ and play at least two of the games there. The main question to keep in mind is “What strategies are the game designers using to persuade you of something?”

W, 9/18

In class

  • Introduction to Fair Use (in the context of Lessig’s talk)
  • Writing Fair Use statements together (using this pdf)

What’s due

  • Read:
    • Lawrence Lessig, “REMIX: How Creativity is Being Strangled by the Law” (SMR 155-69)
    • OR, if you prefer, watch a video. The text in your book was actually transcribed from a talk that you can watch online. Plus, it includes lots of entertaining slides: http://blip.tv/lessig/remix-at-computer-history-museum-1600233
    • Even if you prefer reading or watching the video, please take a minute to at least try both. Ask yourself, “What changed when this talk was written down?” (I like watching the video with my book open so I can compare the two. There are minor differences!)
    • (As always, be sure you have a copy of the reading available in class, even if you only watched the video. This copy can be digital or print this time.)

F, 9/20

I’m out of town, so class won’t meet. Instead of class, please watch my video lecture about RA1.

What’s due

Even though we’re not meeting in class, please post the following assignment on your blog by the time your class would normally begin.

  1. Take a screenshot of an interesting or important moment in the game that you think you’ll write about for RA2. (If you don’t remember how, refer to http://www.take-a-screenshot.org/.)
  2. Crop your image so it focuses on just the most important or interesting part of the image.
    1. To crop an image on a Windows computer, see “How to Crop an Image with Microsoft Paint
    2. To crop an image using the web photo editor Pixlr, see “Pixlr, a Quick Guide for Online Photo Editing
  3. Upload the new version of your image to a new blog post.
    1. Be sure to select that you want to add a “text” post, because you’re going to include writing along with your image.
    2. Click “add picture” or “add media” (depending on which editing screen you’re on), browse to where your cropped image is saved on your computer, and upload it to your post.
  4. Write a very brief statement about why you believe you have a fair use right to post this image. Respond to each factor in the four-factor test. (PDF of the fair use checklist we used in class, and an introduction to that checklist)
    1. This statement can simply be a list with one sentence about each of the four factors. There’s no need to write a lot if you don’t have a lot to say about one of the factors.

————————————

Week 6

M, 9/23

In class

  • Peer review time

What’s due

  • Have a draft of RA2 available to share with your group. Unlike last time, this can be a digital or print draft–as long as you’re able to share it with your small group.

W, 9/25

In class

  • Brief readings discussion
  • NEW: Reading sample essays together
  • Proofreading tips for the final draft of RA2

What’s due

  • Read Henry Jenkins, “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars? Grassroots Creativity Meets the Media Industry” (SMR 203-35)

  • Just focus on preparing an awesome RA2.

F, 9/27

In class

What’s due

————————————

Week 7

M, 9/30

In class

What’s due

  • Read:
    • David Weinberger, “Social Knowing” (in the readings folder in Moodle)
  • Write an informal post on your blog in which you complete the following statements:
    • “This chapter made me think of __________.” [Fill in the blank with a brief story of at least 4 sentences.]
    • “If someone read this chapter and wrote an angry review of it, that person might say ___________.” [Again, write at least 4 sentences here.]
    • “In the following sentence or passage from Weinberger, I felt like I could really hear his voice:_________.” [Just give the one quote, and include the page numbers of the quote.]

W, 10/2

In class

  • Discuss Weinberger
  • Read and critique some of your blog posts together

What’s due

  • Write comments on at least two of your classmates’ blog posts, which are accessible through Moodle in the “Class Blogs and Twitter Accounts” document at the top of the page. Follow the guidelines for strong comments that we discussed in class on Monday. (Please be sure to not just pick the people at the top of the list. Look for a post that doesn’t have a comment yet!)

F, 10/4

In class

  • Read and critique more of your blog posts
  • Follow-up on voice discussion from last Friday

What’s due

  • Nothing.

————————————

Week 8

M, 10/7

In class

  • Peer review of RA3 drafts

What’s due

  • Complete draft of RA3, either print or digital

W, 10/9

In class

  • Discussion: When Wikipedia doesn’t work
  • Introduction to Rhetorical Figures

What’s due

F, 10/11

In class

What’s due

  • Bring a printout of your most recent version of RA3

————————————

Week 9

M, 10/14

In class

  • You’ve been working remarkably hard. Take a break. No class. (I’ll be in my office during class time if you want to meet one-on-one.)

What’s due

  • RA3, submitted as a new post on your blog due at 11:59 p.m. on Monday night.
    • If you wrote a collaborative essay, submit it on just one person’s blog and send me your individual statements via email before class begins, following the guidelines on the Alternative RA3 page.
    • If you composed a video RA3, submit it as a new post on your blog–again, following all the guidelines on the Alternative RA3 page.

No class on W or F for Fall Break

————————————

Week 10

M, 10/21

In class

What’s due

W, 10/23

In class

  • Analyzing sample proposals
  • Continuing final project brainstorming

What’s due

  • Nothing (but I assume you’re working on your proposal for Friday?)

F, 10/25

In class

  • Library info session, led by our reference/instruction librarian Rachael Altman (@RachaelAltman)

What’s due

  • Research proposal, submitted as a post on your blog before class begins

————————————

Week 11

M, 10/28

In class

  • Brief practice finding sources
  • Practice quoting, using your blog posts as sample texts to fix up.

What’s due

  • Read Shirky, chapter 5. (Yes, we’re skipping chapter 4.)
  • On a new post on your blog, write a response to any of Shirky’s ideas that seem most interesting and relevant to the course. (Write something that will be interesting to us, your teacher and classmates, which means you don’t have to summarize anything.)
    • To practice quoting, you must quote Shirky at least twice in your post. (Quote him when it seems natural, to draw attention to points of his that you’re responding to.) Once, build up to the quote by using a verb and a comma right before the quote, and once build up to the quote by writing a complete sentence with a colon. Include parenthetical citations for each quote, using either MLA or APA format. Like this:
      • First required type of quote, using MLA format: Shirky’s main problem is with people who watch too much TV. He writes, “People watch too much TV” (54).
      • Second required type of quote, using APA format: Shirky’s second problem is with people who don’t value amateur writers: “They think that everything should go through formal production companies” (2010, p. 67).
  • Make sure your quotes cite Shirky with correct MLA or APA format, and include an MLA or APA-formatted citation of his book at the bottom of the page.

W, 10/30

In class

  • Discussion of Shirky chapter 5
  • Research discussion: how it’s going, what’s hard, how we can help each other

What’s due

  • Nothing (because you’re working on your annotated bib)

F, 11/1

In class

  • Practice identifying and citing different kinds of sources

What’s due

  • Four entries of your annotated bibliography, each posted as a new note in your shared Evernote folder. See the assignment sheet for details.

————————————

Week 12

M, 11/4

In class

  • Brief introduction to tagging and categorizing (in both Evernote and WordPress)
  • Exploring multimodal texts

What’s due

W, 11/6

In class

  • Discussion of Jenkins: what does fandom have to do with my project?

What’s due

  • Read Henry Jenkins, “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars? Grassroots Creativity Meets the Media Industry” (SMR 203-35)

F, 11/8

In class

  • TBD, depending on what we need most at this point.

What’s due

  • Nothing! Keep reading and annotating sources for the annotated bib!

————————————

Week 13

M, 11/11

In class

What’s due

  • Come to class with a free account at wix.com.

W, 11/13

In class

  • Discuss boyd and how to apply her ideas and terminology to the final project
  • Final questions about the annotated bibliography project

What’s due

  • Read danah boyd, “Participating in the Always-On Lifestyle” (Social Media Reader 71-76) (It’s the shortest and most fun essay in the book.)

F, 11/15

Last day to drop the class without a penalty; see this post on the Portal.

In class

  • Prep for the in-class essay next week

What’s due

————————————

Week 14

M, 11/18

In class

  • Discuss the final project assignment details
  • Explore examples of digital scholarship
    • As an example, we’ll all browse part of the recent online book The New Work of Composing, edited by Debra Journet, Cheryl Ball, and Ryan Trauman.
    • In the shared notes Google Doc, each partner group will take notes on two of the chapters. Choose chapters where the authors’ first, middle, or last names begin with the same letters as your first, middle, or last names. (If that’s not possible, just pick one that no one else seems to be writing about.)
    • Specifically, we’ll discuss:
      • How the chapter authors organized their work
      • How the authors used multimodal elements
      • How the authors gave credit to their sources
      • Anything else that is worth mentioning
  • Final questions about the in-class essay on Wednesday

What’s due

  • Nothing (but you obviously have plenty of work to do)

W, 11/20

In class

What’s due

  • Please bring paper and pen to class to handwrite your essay; I won’t provide anything, and you don’t want to be that annoying person asking for supplies from neighbors.

F, 11/22

In class

  • Discuss the presentation assignment
  • Watch examples of presentations and make a list of things we like and don’t like in them

What’s due

————————————

Week 15

M, 11/25

No classes W or F for Thanksgiving break

Note: I will  have my usual Tuesday office hours before Thanksgiving break.

————————————

Week 16

M, 12/2

MEET IN OUR USUAL WEDNESDAY/FRIDAY ROOM IN SCARBOROUGH

In class:

  • Day 1 of short, persuasive presentations

W, 12/4

In class:

  • Day 2 of short, persuasive presentations

F, 12/6

In class:

  • Day 3 of short, persuasive presentations
  • We’ll spend the remaining time doing voluntary, class-wide peer-review of final project drafts.

————————————

Exam Week

Final project due by Monday, December 9 at 9:00 a.m., submitted as a post on your blog with a link to your project on Wix and a Statement of Goals and Choices written on the blog.

There is no final exam; however, we may still meet at our scheduled exam time to make up any missed days or to complete presentations. (This probably won’t happen, but I’m leaving it open as a possibility, just in case.) Scheduled exam times are as follows:

  • 10am class: Monday, Dec. 9, 10:15-12:15
  • 11am class: Tuesday, Dec. 10, 10:15-12:15
  • 1pm class: Monday, Dec. 9, 3:15-5:15

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4 thoughts on “Schedule

  1. Pingback: Welcome! « Rhetoric 351, Fall 2013

  2. Pingback: Technology Requirements for Early Assignments « Rhetoric 351, Fall 2013

  3. Pingback: A whirlwind first week… | Rhetoric 351, Fall 2013

  4. Pingback: An Email I Just Wrote | Rhetoric 351, Fall 2013

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