Publish Your Final Project in a Peer-Reviewed Journal

Logo for TheJUMP journal

There’s a peer-reviewed, online journal out there that’s made for your final projects. No, seriously.

TheJUMP (Journal for Undergraduate Multimedia Projects) is specifically designed to publish pieces just like the ones you’re working on.

Submitting is really easy. Right after you turn in your final project to me, head to TheJUMP‘s submission information page, create a log-in, and share the link to your project there. (In fact, they previously have published a project that was created by a student using Wix, as you are; to check it out, click here for the project’s info page and then look for the “click here to go to Project” link.)

Here’s what will happen after you submit your piece to them (which I’ve pasted in from their submission information page):

Upon receiving a submission, TheJUMP Editors view the project and send it out to two members of our editorial collective for blind-review.  Those reviewers make a decision in regards to the quality of the project and its fit for TheJUMP.  In so doing, they rank the project on a four point scale: 4 – accept and publish as is (or with very minor revisions); 3 – publish with revisions; 2 – revise and resubmit; 1 – reject.  For all submissions, our reviewers evaluate the work based on its overall quality, how well it fits with the assignment that gave rise to it, its timeliness and/or potential impact for our audience, and so on.  Beyond that, they view each submission as a “teachable moment” and attempt to provide feedback in such a manner as to help the student author(s) improve the overall quality of the work.

So even if you’re not sure your piece is up to publication standards yet, don’t worry: the editors will walk you through a process to help you get it there.

Think of how useful this could be to you: on your resume, you could put, “Peer-reviewed journal publication.” Makes you look pretty good.

(Notice the variety of rhetorical appeals I’m using to convince you to submit….)

Image from http://jump.dwrl.utexas.edu/.